Forest ecology

News

Ozone affects plants, insects and microorganisms, and poses a threat to global biodiversity

28 de August 2020Anna Ramon Revilla

According to a study co-authored by CREAF-based CSIC researcher Josep Peñuelas and published in Science Advances, increases in ozone in Earth’s atmosphere will be a danger to the biodiversity of the Mediterranean Basin, Japan and equatorial Africa by 2100.

News

New proposals to understand how the planet’s vegetation works

20 de July 2020CREAF

An international team -where Josep Peñuelas has participated- explores the factors that most affect plant behavior and how they can be included in predictive models to improve them. The result, published in Nature Plants wants to improve understanding of the global carbon cycle and ecosystem services and their future if forests change due to climate change.

Knowledge

The hidden side of rarity: it’s not that rare being rare

3 de April 2020Francisco Lloret

Begoña García has spent many years passionately studying a curious plant, Borderea chouardii. It is a rare species with a biogeographical origin that dates back to the Tertiary and remains confined to a few limestone cliffs in the Central Pyrenees. Unknown until the middle of the 20th century, it is considered an endangered species. But... is it?

News

A year of respite for Catalonia’s forests

20 de March 2020Verónica Couto Antelo

With spring almost upon us, CREAF’s experts are reporting that this year could be a chance for Catalonia’s forests to recover from accumulated past droughts and the devastating effects of the pine processionary. There will be no let-up for the territory’s undergrowth, however, with the box tree moth’s continuing expansion leaving just 20% of box plants with new growth.

News

The Cocoon system improves success rates when reforesting degraded land

24 de February 2020Anna Ramon Revilla

Around 30,000 trees and shrubs were planted between 2016 and 2019 in the Mediterranean basin and the Canary Islands, with a survival rate achieved that varied between 20 and 80%, depending on the species involved. The economic analysis shows that the Cocoon system can be up to four times more profitable than the normal reforestation method.

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