Albert Naya i Díaz

Fascinated by the singularity of our Earth, I have recently travelled out of necessity. Shortly before that I followed a trainee program to become a Science teacher, which has always been my dream. Even before that, I had completed a degree in Environmental Science (2010-14) and previously, I had studied Journalism for four years (2006-10), always at the UAB. All these have helped me to join CREAF as a Communication Technician on the 2nd of Dec 2015.
News

Achieving the COP21 agreements is currently far-fetched

The COP21 set the maximum temperature increase for 2100 at 1.5° C. The only scenario which would allow achievement of this goal would require vastly reducing human CO2 emissions, significantly increasing the prominence of renewable energies, and the use of some type of artificial carbon sequestration technology.

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CREAF will help European forestry adapt to climate change

Enrique Doblas is part of a European interest group on climate change adaptation in the forestry sector. CREAF’s knowledge and innovations will be taken into account when planning solutions to fight climate change.

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The ‘Tinder’ of the forestry and environment sectors

Forestry Hub is a digital tool for getting in touch with actors in the forestry and environment sectors, capable of effectively uniting supply and demand of services for those involved.

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Phosphorus, once only a nutrient, has become a contaminant on a global scale

Freshwater ecosystems near densely populated areas have levels of phosphorus which are very high and out of balance with nitrogen levels. This has resulted in altered ecosystem functioning, lower water quality, and has made water conservation more difficult.

News

Remote sensing of leaf pigments will improve climate change models

An international team of researchers co-led by Josep Peñuelas (CSIC and CREAF) has developed a new method for monitoring changes in the photosynthetic activity of perennial conifers throughout the year. This new technique, based on the analysis of remote sensing images captured by satellites, will improve global models of atmospheric carbon capture and permit more precise predictions about climate change.

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