Anna Ramon Revilla

Communication manager at CREAF. I have a Biology degree (UAB) and I'm Master in Science Communication (UPF). Passionate about corporate communication with more than 7 years in the environmental R&D sector. Since 2011 I'm managing CREAF communication strategy.
News

Why were mammoths and other megaherbivores so big?

According to a study Josep Peñuelas has published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, the size of herbivorous megafauna was crucial to their survival in a cold, dry, largely barren environment. The study's data were obtained by incorporating the hugely significant effect of herbivores into innovative mathematical models capable of simulating landscape evolution.

News

Promoting borders between crops is vital to pollinator survival

Two CREAF researchers have taken part in the study, which shows that small, irregularly shaped fields on farmland boost the number and abundance of species. This is because pollinators use crop borders as highways or corridors for movement and protection. The trend of ever larger crop fields is endangering insect pollinator populations and their ability to pollinate crops

News

Climate change is causing plants to flower earlier and changing the rhythm of nature

CREAF and the companies Altran and Starlab have led the design of RitmeNatura.cat, a citizen observatory that encourages members of the public to ‘adopt’ a plant, record the changes it undergoes and provide data that can be used to study the effects of climate change.

News

Earth observation can help conserve protected natural areas

To celebrate passing its halfway point, the European project ECOPOTENTIAL is organizing a photo exhibition and a workshop that will generate awareness of innovations in the field of remote sensing which can be applied to the management, monitoring and conservation of protected natural areas.

News

Men from wealthy countries are getting taller because their diet is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus

Mean male height in countries with a high level of GDP is 23 cm greater than in countries with a low level, a difference that has risen by 1.5 cm over the last 30 years. Thanks to a more varied diet rich in animal products, the annual nitrogen and phosphorus intake of people in wealthy countries is practically twice that of those in poor countries.

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