Knowledge

In the cradle of civilization

26 de June 2018Jaume Terradas

The Poem of Gilgamesh is the oldest known fiction text, and represents brilliantly the conflict between nomadic and agricultural and urban societies; between nature and city. A conflict that lasts from 5.000 years ago Mesopotamia to the current Iraq.

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“With the urban population set to grow by 56% by 2050, we need to make cities greener to protect biodiversity”

4 de May 2018Verónica Couto Antelo

We interviewed Yolanda Melero, holder of a PhD in biology, whose studies have revolved around the behaviour and dynamics of American mink populations. At CREAF she is continuing to investigate how animal populations function, but is now focusing on butterflies to learn about biodiversity-friendly city design.

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The Salton Sea

5 de April 2018Jaume Terradas

Jaume Terradas explains how an error in channeling the water of the Colorado River in California created a large artificial lake that, now, is endangered by the great water demand from the crop fields and nearby cities.

A feather for the hat, ma’am?

26 de February 2018Jaume Terradas

Birds for their feathers, but many other animals too, suffer the path to extinction because of human whims.

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It’s already available CREAF Talk by Scott Ollinger about nitrogen and carbon assimilation in forests

22 de February 2018CREAF

A new video of CREAF Talks conferences is now available. Scott Ollinger, from University of New Hampshire, USA, talks about basic relations among foliar N and CO2 assimilation in forests, relationships between N concentrations and a suite of functionally convergent plant traits that influence canopy reflectance, and implications for broad-scale N mapping and ecosystem—climate interactions.

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The CREAF Talk video about animal innovation by Louis Lefebvre

21 de February 2018CREAF

The researcher from McGill University, in Quebec, and CREAF associated, visited us again to talk about animal innovation from different points of view, from the ecological implications to the physiological characteristics that allow it.

About flowers, insects and networks

7 de February 2018Francisco Lloret

Nature establishes relationships between species and organisms, forming a very complex network where often great-interconnected nodes appear. They are called 'hubs'. But humans also create this kind of networks, such as airports as nodes and flights as connections.

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It’s already available CREAF Talk by Roderick Dewar about macroecological patterns

2 de February 2018CREAF

The fourth video of the CREAF Talks conferences is now available. Roderick Dewar, from the Australian National University, presents an approach inspired by how complex systems are modelled in physics.

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