News

The BeWater publishes a guide about participatory management of river basins

28 de June 2017Verónica Couto Antelo

The manual, in which the CREAF researchers Anabel Sánchez and Annelies Broekman have participated, summarizes the stages of the BeWater project and the lessons learned in the creation of adaptation plans between scientists and local society.

Diana and Eduard Pascual Plan co-published a book about adapting the Mediterranean basin to climate change

13 de June 2017Verónica Couto Antelo

The book, available in English, focuses on the nature reserve shared between southern Spain and northern Morocco. In particular, it values the impacts of climate change on the availability of water from an ecological, socio-economic and political point of view.

Achieving the COP21 agreements is currently far-fetched

9 de June 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

The COP21 set the maximum temperature increase for 2100 at 1.5° C. The only scenario which would allow achievement of this goal would require vastly reducing human CO2 emissions, significantly increasing the prominence of renewable energies, and the use of some type of artificial carbon sequestration technology.

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CREAF will help European forestry adapt to climate change

8 de June 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

Enrique Doblas is part of a European interest group on climate change adaptation in the forestry sector. CREAF’s knowledge and innovations will be taken into account when planning solutions to fight climate change.

Cities threaten millions of years of bird evolution

31 de May 2017Anna Ramon Revilla

A study led by Daniel Sol, CISC researcher based at CREAF, shows that cities preserve 450 million years less evolutionary history compared to natural environments. Birds capable of surviving in highly urbanized environments have undergone recent evolution. The arrival of exotic species does not compensate for poor urban evolutionary diversity.

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Scant dwelling options cause the dormouse to raise a larger number of males

24 de May 2017Verónica Couto Antelo

Some populations of the edible dormouse have become isolated due to destruction or severe alteration of their habitat. A recent study by CREAF and the Granollers Natural Science Museum shows that litters from isolated groups have more males than females since the males are the more exploratory sex charged with finding new territories. 

The ‘Tinder’ of the forestry and environment sectors

22 de May 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

Forestry Hub is a digital tool for getting in touch with actors in the forestry and environment sectors, capable of effectively uniting supply and demand of services for those involved.

Plants absorb pharmaceuticals and personal-care products carried by irrigation water

18 de May 2017CREAF

Pharmaceutical and personal-care products for human and animal use are increasingly released into the environment. 

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