Etiqueta: birds

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Birds that live in changing environments have larger brains

16 de January 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

A large brain increases the capacity to adjust behavior to new circumstances through learning, improving resource-gathering in a changing environment. Greater understanding of this capacity can improve predictions of what species of birds and other animals will be most vulnerable to global change.

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Birds provide us with the clues to understanding human creativity

10 de May 2016Anna Ramon Revilla

An analysis of 1018 bird species led by CREAF and CSIC scientists suggests that innovation is not just an adaptation on it own, but emerges with the combination of certain adaptations which developed for dealing with changes in the environment, including having a large brain and being curious. Primates, cetaceans, parrots, and crows innovate because they have long lifespans and are adapted to living in changing environments.

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Birds and butterflies are key indicators for the measurement of biodiversity loss

11 de November 2015Anna Ramon Revilla

According to a study in which CREAF participated, the populations of birds or butterflies living in open habitats have been negatively affected by the loss of field and scrubland habitat. Conversely, species which live in forests have been favored. These variations were related with changes in the Catalonian (and Mediterranean) landscape over the last few decades. 

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More intelligent birds will be stressed less

17 de September 2013Anna Ramon Revilla

A new international study relates brain size to the amount of stress hormone in birds. A larger brain increases cognitive ability, which allows them to face new challenges and, ultimately, a more relaxed lifestyle compared to those with a small brain.

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Animals have adapted to city life by adjusting their behavior

25 de July 2013Anna Ramon Revilla

According to experts at the CREAF, this capability assures success in the city and the possibility to become "urbanite" animals. A comprehensive review of published studies concludes that in urban environments, species often change their eating habits, lose their fear of humans and modify their way of communicating.

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