Etiqueta: insects

Knowledge

About flowers, insects and networks

7 de February 2018Francisco Lloret

Nature establishes relationships between species and organisms, forming a very complex network where often great-interconnected nodes appear. They are called 'hubs'. But humans also create this kind of networks, such as airports as nodes and flights as connections.

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Sergio Osorio defends his doctoral thesis and shows that the rules of ecology can still be revised

20 de December 2017Verónica Couto Antelo

Are the insects which begin their adult life in the coldest months the largest? An accepted paradigm within ecology, Bergmann's rule, says that organisms in the coldest regions of the Earth tend to be larger. Two months ago,  Sergio Osorio presented his doctoral thesis at CREAF in which he analyzed this principle to test if seasonality is also related with body size. 

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Climate change could change the gender ratio of acorn weevils

6 de October 2015Anna Ramon Revilla

According to a study in which CREAF participated, the delay of late-summer rains could change the equilibrium between males and females in these Mediterranean weevils, favoring the females. The authors have shown that male weevils are more sensitive to prolonged drought. 

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Increased ozone levels reduce flowers’ sex appeal

17 de September 2015Anna Ramon Revilla

New research finds that as climate change increases ozone levels, pollinators will have a harder timing finding plants that feed them. That’s going to be a problem for the bees that pollinate a third of the world’s food supply. Flowers and other plants rely on microscopic scent molecules to attract the bees and other pollinators that feed on them. Climate change is going to disrupt that process, mostly because of ground-level ozone, which is projected to increase over the coming decades. The study, published in the journal New Phytologist, found that flowers’ fragile scent molecules break down more quickly as they are exposed to greater levels of ozone. >> Read the full article from Takepart.com here

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Flowers pollinized by insects are more fragrant than those pollinized by the wind

1 de July 2015Marina Torres Gibert

A study published in the journal Biochemical Systematics and Ecologyand carried out by a team of CREAF researchers has shown that pollination by insects increases emissions of the molecules that give flowers their odors. Flower fragrances are needed to attract insects and guarantee the exchange of pollen with other flowers.  

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