Etiqueta: jordi sardans

News

Excessive nitrogen fertilization of wheat crops may explain the high prevalence of celiac disease

4 de March 2021Adriana Clivillé

Wheat fields are being fertilized with more and more nitrogen and this practice may be directly linked to the increasing prevalence of celiac disease, an autoimmune human condition. Between the 1960s and today, there has been a ten-fold increase in the use of nitrogen fertiliser for wheat crops worldwide, because it improves soil yields.

News

Jean Leon and CREAF cooperate on a study of carbon sequestration in vineyards

1 de February 2021CREAF

The test underway will reveal how much atmospheric carbon dioxide soil absorbs with different types of cover crops. CREAF researcher Jordi Sardans is coordinating the study.

News

“Science is a long-term human effort”: a conversation with the 4 researchers from CREAF appointed highly cited 2020

15 de December 2020Adriana Clivillé

The need for inclusive science, ranking bias, brain loss, and the responsibility to train people are the focus of a debate with the 4 CREAF researchers included in the Clarivate index of The Web of Science’s Clarivate index 2020 .

News

The greening of the earth is approaching its limit

11 de December 2020Anna Ramon Revilla

A new study published in Science reveals that the fertilizing effect of excess CO2 on vegetation is decreasing worldwide. The lack of water and nutrients limit the greening observed in recent years and can cause CO2 levels in the atmosphere to rise rapidly, temperatures to increase and there to be increasingly severe changes in the climate.

News

Some plants do not reproduce every year because of nutrient scarcity

10 de December 2019Verónica Couto Antelo

A study involving three CREAF researchers has found that plants with low nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in their leaves do not reproduce every year to enable them to reproduce on a huge scale in years in which conditions are right. Oaks, holm oaks and beeches are examples of trees that behave in such a way.

News

Forests are retaining carbon for less and less time

19 de November 2019CREAF

Published in the journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences), a study to which the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and CREAF have contributed has revealed that the time for which forests retain carbon has fallen by between 0.2% and 0.3% every year in recent decades. Plant mortality is rising due to higher carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and, in particular, warming and droughts. The time in question, which is termed carbon turnover time, is a relevant factor in climate change projections as it is indicative of carbon sinks’ capacity to retain carbon.

News

Men from wealthy countries are getting taller because their diet is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus

18 de December 2017Anna Ramon Revilla

Mean male height in countries with a high level of GDP is 23 cm greater than in countries with a low level, a difference that has risen by 1.5 cm over the last 30 years. Thanks to a more varied diet rich in animal products, the annual nitrogen and phosphorus intake of people in wealthy countries is practically twice that of those in poor countries.

News

The greening of the earth is reaching its limit

19 de September 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

A new study led by Josep Peñuelas and published in Nature Ecology and Evolution reveals that CO2 abundance in the atmosphere no longer has a powerful fertilizing effect on vegetation. The greening that has been observed in recent years is slowing and this will cause CO2 levels in the atmosphere to rise, thus increasing temperatures and leading to increasingly severe changes in climate.

News

Climate change is already threatening the Mediterranean ecosystems of Catalonia

19 de July 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

An extensive review of studies and databases reveals that drought and an increase in temperature are already causing species substitutions, greater aridity, higher forest fire risk, lower soil fertility, and lower water availability, among other negative impacts.

News

Phosphorus, once only a nutrient, has become a contaminant on a global scale

17 de March 2017Albert Naya i Díaz

Freshwater ecosystems near densely populated areas have levels of phosphorus which are very high and out of balance with nitrogen levels. This has resulted in altered ecosystem functioning, lower water quality, and has made water conservation more difficult.

News

Scientists identify the 13 most important research challenges to face global change in the Mediterranean region

3 de February 2015J.Luis Ordóñez

Scientists consider it key to understand why droughts kill so many trees and the influence of local forest histories on tree mortality. They also warn that we know very little about the joined effects of different disturbances on each ecosystem, and highlight the necessity to plan research projects covering more time and space. 

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